T.R.A.P CAMP

Teaching respect about our planet

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Mama asked me "son when the trappin' gon' quit?" Is a lyric from the song, Tshirt by the Migos. “The Trap”, “Trappin”, “Trap House” and “Trap Music” are common terms in the hip hop community and a subgenre of hip hop music that started in Atlanta. The meaning of the word, trap, gets its meaning from selling drugs and explains the life of growing up in the south. Many African American youths grow up in the “trap” and do not understand how systemic racism has played a part in their communities becoming the “Trap '' and this is what TRAP Camp will do.

Not only will TRAP Camp explore the meaning of “Trap” and how it pertains to our environment but TYRP members will also be introduced to the beauty of camping. This idea was inspired by co-founder Antonio “Tmade '' Taylor's experience as a child camping with parents. As a child growing up in the rough streets of Joliet, Ill, Antonio’s mother would often take him camping to enjoy the peace of nature.

Real Issues

Importance

Put the Camp in TRAP Camp

History

Why is this important? It is important because last year in 2020, African American students experienced repeated trauma due to being out of school, Covid-19, and the repeated images of the death of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. We also want to diversify the idea of camping as well. In a 2018 study by the Society of American Foresters found that between 2010 and 2014, 94.6% of visitors to national forests identified as white. People who identified as Latino made up 5.7%, and those who identified as Black made up 1.2%.

Not only will TRAP Camp explore the meaning of “Trap” and how it pertains to our environment but members will also be introduced to the beauty of camping. This idea was inspired by co-founder Antonio “Tmade '' Taylor's experience as a child camping with parents. As a child growing up in the rough streets of Joliet, Ill, Antonio’s mother would often take him camping to enjoy the peace of nature.

In order to decrease the violence in our city, we must heal our youth and give them alternatives to violence. Hip Hop has always been a great unifier of diverse populations and PUBD will provide Louisville youth an opportunity to meet other youth across the city by unifying them through the love of Hip Hop. Louisville youth will perform with one another and make music that unifies rather than divides. Participates will use hip hop to speak freely about their view on political or social issues and by doing so, engage them to become concerned and aware of these issues. This is important in making the youth aware of the world around them and the conditions they face in society, enabling individuals to discuss ways in which they can make a positive change within society. A few of the issues that hip hop has created awareness in are racial discrimination, individuality, and the importance of education and believing in your dreams. PUBD will also serve as a reflection of the soul and mind and will be a solace for the participants and listeners who may be struggling with the same issues.

Our students, in TRAP Camp will allow African American youth the opportunity to learn about the history of redlining and gentrification by looking through the lens of environmental justice. Students who participate in TRAP (Teaching Respect About our Planet) Camp will also be introduced to the beauty of nature and learn how to camp and travel to local parks. Students will learn about the beauty of our planet but will still be able to “Turn-Up” and heal.